Flourless Brownie Recipe

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Ingredients:

4 oz unsweetened chocolate, chopped

½ cup honey

1/3 cup creamy roasted almond butter (unsweetened)

1 medium ripe avocado, pitted

2 large eggs, room temperature

1 TBSP coconut sugar

1 tsp baking soda

½ tsp sea salt

 

Preheat the oven to 350. Line an 8-inch-by-8-inch baking dish with parchment paper. In a small pot over very low heat, combine the chocolate, honey, and almond butter. Stir constantly until melted and smooth. Transfer to a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Scoop the avocado flesh into the food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Process until creamy and very smooth, about 1 minute. Transfer the batter to the parchment-lined pan and spread it out evenly. Bake for 25-30 minutes until a toothpick inserted comes out mostly clean or with a few moist crumbs attached. Cool completely, then refrigerate for 2 hours before cutting into 16 squares. Store the brownies in the refrigerator or freezer in an airtight container.

Testosterone: Achieving a Delicate Balance

Testosterone and women

 

When a woman goes through menopause and her ovaries stop producing estrogen and progesterone, the pituitary responds by increasing FSH, a hormone from the pituitary gland that has regulated these hormones throughout her reproductive life. However, when all the eggs have been depleted, no further estrogen or progesterone can be produced. Nonetheless, the pituitary, which is “hard-wired” to respond to low estrogen, continues to make increasingly higher levels of FSH.

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Resuming HRT in Breast Cancer Survivors

Resuming HRT in Breast Cancer Survivors

I am often asked whether breast cancer survivors can ever safely initiate HRT. In addition, they are often taking estrogen blocker drugs, like tamoxifen, especially if their breast cancer was positive for estrogen receptors. These women frequently suffer severe symptoms of estrogen deficiency.

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Problem Periods – It’s Not Normal!

Problem Periods Are Not Normal

 

In the first five to seven years after the first menstrual period and the last ten years before menopause there can be variability in the cycles. Between the ages of 20 and 40 most women’s menstrual cycles fall into a familiar pattern of 28-day cycles. A pattern of very short (less than 21 days) or very long (greater than 35 days) time between menstrual periods or skipped periods indicates the woman is not ovulating. Extremely painful or heavy menstrual periods lasting longer than 7 days are also a cause for evaluation.

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Tying Your Tubes: The Rest of The Story

The Truth About Tubal Ligation

The euphemistic term “tying your tubes,” actually means the tubes are surgically and permanently severed or scarred to prevent the passage of an egg. That is after all, the goal. Tubal ligation methods may differ in their effectiveness for preventing pregnancy and in the risk of damaging the blood supply to the ovaries. Many women don’t understand that a tubal ligation may cause them to go through perimenopause prematurely. There are structures in the tubes, such as nerves and blood vessels feeding the ovaries, which can be damaged in the procedure. Damage to blood supply can affect the function of the ovaries. At the very least, after tubal ligation, some women begin having heavy bleeding with their periods and they may also develop symptoms akin to perimenopause. Rarely, tubal ligation can lead to premature menopause.

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Progestins Reduce The Cardiac Benefits of Estrogen

Progestins Reduce The Cardiac Benefits of Estrogen

 

All the adverse effects from the oral route of administration of estrogen as previously outlined in Outliving Your Ovaries can also occur from oral Prempro. However, the addition of the progestin seems to confer additional cardiac risk. Perhaps giving progestins daily instead of in cycles of 14 days each calendar month may be a factor in this increased risk. Earlier observational studies, like the Nurses’ Health Study, predominantly used oral cyclic progestins and did not show an increased risk of heart disease.

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Does Estrogen-Only HRT Decrease Breast Cancer Risk? Here’s The Rest of The Story!

Estrogen-Only Hrt

A recent study in Lancet Oncology looking at data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) reported that the use of estrogen (Premarin) alone was NOT associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and the use of estrogen-progestin (Prempro) increased the risk of breast cancer.

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The Risk of Breast Cancer from Menopause Hormone Replacement and Statins, Commonly Used Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs is the Same


In her new book, “Outliving Your Ovaries,” Endocrinologist Dr. Marina Johnson reveals compelling research that compares the risks and benefits of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) to statins and other commonly used drugs.

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‘Outliving Your Ovaries’ Is a Book That Should Interest Every Member of The Human Race, Including Men!

Outliving Your Ovaries

 

“Outliving Your Ovaries is a book that should interest every member of the human race, including men. Most men have women in their lives (I have a wife, daughter, mother, sister, cousins, etc.) and most women have men in their lives who care about them. Women have a unique biology that I never understood before reading Dr. Johnson’s book.

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Can Estrogen Help Prevent This Silent Killer?

Alzheimer's disease the silent killer, Alzheimer's disease signs and symptoms, Alzheimer's disease and estrogen deficiency,Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other intellectual abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 50 to 80 percent of dementia cases. Alzheimer's is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage Alzheimer's, individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. Alzheimer's is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Those with Alzheimer's live an average of eight years after their symptoms become noticeable to others, but survival can range from four to 20 years, depending on age and other health conditions.

A symptom of estrogen deficiency that many women fear is the decline in memory and mental concentration. Our mothers and grandmothers often accepted this as a necessary consequence of aging. Postmenopausal women often describe it as “brain fog” and “fuzzy thinking.” They especially notice problems with word retrieval and remembering names and phone numbers they could easily recall before menopause.

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MARINA JOHNSON
M.D., F.A.C.E.
MEDICAL DIRECTOR

BOARD CERTIFIED
IN ENDOCRINOLOGY
& METABOLISM AND
INTERNAL MEDICINE

10670 N Central Expressway
Suite 510
Dallas, Texas 75231-2111

214.574.4376 office
214.574.4377 fax

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