Estrogen – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Estrogen is an essential hormone that has over 400 actions on a woman’s body. It’s what defines a woman. It’s been in your body since you were born and increases greatly at the time of puberty. It’s easy to take it for granted when everything is working automatically. When a young woman’s menstrual periods become irregular, painful or accompanied by severe mood swings, anxiety, depression or acne, that’s an indication of a system that’s gone awry. Birth control periods or Depo-Provera are a bad, ugly way to treat these problems. When prescribed, they do little to correct the underlying problem. These signs and symptoms are the way the body communicates to you that it needs help. A better approach is to determine the root cause that’s driving the problem. [click to continue…]

Chronic Insomnia and Hormones

Chronic Insomnia and Hormones

Bonnie had always been able to enjoy a good nights sleep in the past. No matter how stressed she might be, she could count on laying her head on her pillow, falling asleep and waking up the next morning refreshed and rejuvenated. However, when she reached her mid 40’s, her periods started changing and she began experiencing sleep problems. First, she would just have insomnia the night before starting her period. As her periods became more irregular, she started waking up in the middle of the night around 2 or 3 am and would find herself wide awake and unable to go back to sleep. With so little sleep, she would be exhausted the next morning. 

Over-the-counter sleep aids would make her feel sluggish the following day. By the afternoon and early evening, she would be crashing. She came to see me on maximal doses of prescription sleep medicine and still was sleeping poorly.

Bonnie suffered from a very common sleep disorder that occurs at the time of perimenopause or menopause. It’s caused by declining levels of estrogen and/or progesterone. It is characterized by wakefulness in the middle of the night and can be very debilitating when it continues long-term. The typical patient with this type of insomnia often becomes addicted to prescription sleeping pills. Bonnie’s insomnia totally resolved after her estrogen and progesterone levels were normalized.

While menopause occurs in all women, insomnia does not uniformly affect all women and
therefore, women may not recognize that this is a low estrogen symptom. Furthermore, if the
insomnia has gone on for many years, other secondary conditions such as depression, anxiety,
chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, sleep apnea and obesity may also develop.
 Patients are often
prescribed prescription medications such as antidepressants, Xanax, and Adderal for these
conditions! Antidepressants can lead to weight gain and Xanax and Adderal are addictive!
Doesn’t it make more sense to correct the underlying hormone imbalance that’s causing these
symptoms?

It’s important to emphasize that insomnia can result from endocrine problems in both men and
women. Disorders of thyroid hormone, testosterone, cortisol, and growth hormone can all
cause sleep disorders. Detecting a subtle endocrine imbalance may sometimes be difficult
requiring the expertise of an endocrinologist.
 
Sleep is a mysterious bodily process that is
absolutely essential to good health. We should not have to rely on a drug to make us sleep! We
do not have to be “taught” how to sleep. Every member of the animal kingdom has an
obligatory need for sleep. If humans go much more than 18 hours without sleep, they start
experiencing “microsleep” where they “zone out” from a few seconds to minutes. In fact, many
accidents occur when people are sleep-deprived – such as the infamous Exxon Valdez disaster
and the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Falling asleep while driving is responsible for at least
100,000 crashes, 40,000 injuries, and 1550 deaths per year.
 
People can also develop insomnia
from poor lifestyle choices. Overzealous Americans intent on squeezing more work, more fun,
more family time and more sheer activity into their lives often short-change their sleep.

What are ways to promote a good night’s sleep?

Try going to bed at the same time each night
and getting up at the same time. The body likes a regular schedule. Sleep in a cool, dark room –
use nightshades, white noise or a sleep mask if necessary. Avoid spicy food or caffeine-
containing foods in the evening. Finish eating at least 3 hours before bedtime. Many individuals
find that heavy intake of sugar or alcohol at dinner leads to restless sleep. Start winding down in
the evening. Do not engage in heavy exercise late at night. Don’t watch the 10 o’clock news or
read grisly books which cause mental over-stimulation. Individuals who can’t function without a
large dose of coffee in the morning are usually sleep-deprived.

Just how much sleep is enough sleep?

Individuals who consistently get less than seven or eight
hours of sleep per night are often sleep-deprived. Interestingly, people who need MORE than
eight hours of sleep may also have a sleep disorder. They need more than eight hours of sleep
because the sleep they are getting is poor quality sleep. People do not have less need for sleep
with aging. It’s just that sleep disorders are so common in older people that many think this is
“normal.” Most sleeping pills “knock you out” but do not promote normal sleep architecture.

If you are experiencing persistent insomnia, consider seeing an endocrinologist, a physician who
specializes in hormone disorders. Establishing hormone balance can lead to normal, refreshing
sleep which is the body’s own way of healing a myriad of health problems.

Is it better to go through menopause naturally?

December 20th, 2015

 

I’m often asked by women, “Isn’t it better to go through menopause naturally?  If God’s design was for us to go through menopause, why should we still be taking estrogen?”

 

Menopause simply means the end of a woman’s ability to bear children.  In 1900, the average age of menopause was 51, just like it is today, BUT in 1900, the average life expectancy for a woman was 50!  Many women in the 1800s died in childbirth and men often remarried because of this loss.

 

Today in 2015, life expectancy for women is pushing 80!  So essentially with modern medical advances, God has graced women with 30 extra years of life!  What are we to do with this precious gift of 30 extra years that He’s given us?? Are we to squander that gift by letting our bodies fall apart?

 

I think of my body as God’s temple that He’s given to me on loan.  God expects us to be good stewards and care for our bodies.  Taking estrogen is simply putting back a substance that’s part of your original design. Estrogen is a vital hormone that has over 400 actions on a woman’s body.  When you were twenty, you took estrogen for granted because everything worked automatically.  When you become menopausal and your estrogen levels fall, only then do you appreciate it’s significance

 

Women who don’t take estrogen have a higher risk of heart disease, strokes, osteoporosis, dementia and Alzheimer’s.   If this risk can be reduced with estrogen, why would you want to deprive yourself of this potential benefit?

 

I’m not saying ALL women should take estrogen, but every woman at some time in her life needs to make this important decision.  I want women to make that decision based on facts, not from fear and misinformation!  That’s why I wrote my book, “Outliving Your Ovaries:  An Endocrinologist Review the Risks and Rewards of Treating Menopause with Hormone Replacement.”

 

As I close on this weekend before we celebrate Christmas, I want to take a moment to thank God for all the blessings that he’s given me. With all the flurry of gift-giving and social activities at this time, it’s easy for us to forget that Jesus is the reason for this season.

 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

 

Dr. Johnson

Testosterone: Achieving a Delicate Balance

Testosterone and women

 

When a woman goes through menopause and her ovaries stop producing estrogen and progesterone, the pituitary responds by increasing FSH, a hormone from the pituitary gland that has regulated these hormones throughout her reproductive life. However, when all the eggs have been depleted, no further estrogen or progesterone can be produced. Nonetheless, the pituitary, which is “hard-wired” to respond to low estrogen, continues to make increasingly higher levels of FSH.

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Dr Johnson’s Marvelous Muesli Recipe!

Marvelous Muesli Recipe

Dr. Johnson’s Marvelous Muesli Recipe!

 

2 Cups Organic Rolled Oats (not instant)

¼ Cup Raisins

½ Teaspoon of Cinnamon

¼ Teaspoon of Cloves

¼ Teaspoon of Nutmeg

3 Small Scoops of Pure Stevia- Buy It Now Here!

¼ Cup of Walnuts, Brazil Nuts, or Almonds

1 ½ Cups of Coconut Milk

2 Scoops of True Whey Powder- Buy It Now Here!

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Feel Absolutely Empowered!

“Outliving Your Ovaries” is a must read for every woman. Not only because it demystifies so many controversial and conflicting views in treating menopause, but mostly because one can put that book down and feel absolutely empowered! Women can now have the intelligent and informed conversation with their doctors about their bodies that so many of us have struggled to have.

Menstruation: A Story of Myth and Misinformation

Menstruation: A Story of Myth and Misinformation

Every woman remembers her first menstrual period, the beginning of that awesome passage from girl to young woman. Some girls can’t wait for their period to start, while others feel afraid or anxious. But for me, it was a shattering experience.

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Why Low Cholesterol is Not Always The Answer

Why Low Cholesterol Isn't Always the Answer

 

Understanding the biology and physiology of estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone gives us insight on how critical they are to the optimal function of the body. When they are deficient, as in menopause, it’s preferable, whenever possible, to utilize pharmaceutical bioidentical hormones to restore the very same hormones which have been in your body since you went through puberty. Cholesterol, which some people regard as something “bad”, is actually the basic building block for all the hormones made by the ovaries and the adrenal glands. Care should be taken to not aggressively lower cholesterol to extremely low levels with cholesterol lowering drugs because it can cause marked disruption in production of these vital hormones.

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Why Is It Important To Measure Estrogen Blood Levels? Part 2 of 2

Why Is It Important To Measure Estradiol Blood Levels?

 

3. YOU CAN’T JUST GO BY “HOW YOU FEEL!”

I strongly endorse monitoring estradiol and testosterone blood levels to ensure appropriate dosage and effectiveness of hormone therapy. Monitoring estradiol levels in thousands of women since 1986 has led me to develop more precise hormone regimens producing blood levels comparable to a low physiologic range. As noted earlier, monitoring blood levels is especially important with topical therapy. Most post- menopausal women who see me initially have NEVER had their estrogen level checked!

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Why Is It Important To Measure Estrogen Blood Levels? Part 1 of 2

Why Is It Important To Measure Estradiol Blood Levels?

 

Many women who initially see me for menopause have never had their estradiol level checked. Their previous physician may have diagnosed menopause with an elevated FSH, but usually no further tests are done. I’d like to go through various reasons why I believe it is important to monitor estradiol levels.

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MARINA JOHNSON
M.D., F.A.C.E.
MEDICAL DIRECTOR

BOARD CERTIFIED
IN ENDOCRINOLOGY
& METABOLISM AND
INTERNAL MEDICINE

10670 N Central Expressway
Suite 510
Dallas, Texas 75231-2111

214.574.4376 office
214.574.4377 fax

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